Wool News

Wool Connect Conference Set for October 6-8

Written by CCWG Tuesday, September 22, 2020

Wool Connect Conference Set for October 6-8, 2020

 
The Schneider Group – is a family-run multinational company based in Italy since 1922 that source, process and supply wool and natural fibres to assist their customers in producing sustainable, fully traceable and high-quality products.  They are planning a virtual meeting concerning sustainability and would like to see wool producers from all around the world take part on October 6-8.  The Wool Connect Conference is all about bringing together people from the wool supply chain and communicating the beautiful stories wool and sheep have to tell. It is believed artists also play an important role in telling stories of rural communities, farmers and of course sheep. 
 
The three-day event will consist of two-hour sessions each day filled with speakers from retail, the wool supply chain as well as other organizations and service suppliers to the wool industry. The goal of the event is to provide information to wool growers about the interest from brands and retailers in sustainability. Other topics to be covered include the latest market insights, solutions to meet the wool demand of the future and accelerate change through consensus while also providing an opportunity for direct dialogue between wool growers and retail apparel companies. 
 
The Wool Connect Online Grower Conference is part of the Schneider Group’s sustainability strategy ‘Together 2030,’ which sets clear science-based targets to combat climate change. In order to successfully implement the Together 2030 strategy, the Schneider Group has developed activities and projects in two areas: 1. industrial emissions reduction within all Schneider Group industrial plants and offices, and 2. wool supply chain collaboration through the Authentico Integrity Scheme and beyond. The Wool Connect conference invites all wool growers and supply chain partners to exchange knowledge and solutions to work together to fight against climate change and ensure a sustainable future for the wool industry, which is also a healthier, more lucrative business for all. 
 
While the conference will be live during the day in Italy, it will begin at 12 noon eastern time each day. Participants can also view recorded sessions at any time that is convenient after the live presentations have ended. The conference will also offer an art auction and is inviting those who photograph the sheep industry to participate.  The purpose of the Art Gallery is to offer artists a platform to showcase their work to an international audience and hopefully also sell some of their pieces through the art auction system that has been set up. 
 
Please contact Eric Bjergso at CCWG if you are interested in participating  ericb@wool.ca

The full program can be viewed at

www.gschneider.com/conference

Art gallery information

www.gschneider.com/art-gallery

 
Posted in Wool News

'Made to last': More than 100 years old, Canadian wool company thrives in changing knitting market

Written by Heather Barrett - CBC Tuesday, February 18, 2020

'Made to last': More than 100 years old, Canadian wool company thrives in changing knitting market

Briggs & Little survives by keeping its yarn and its business old school, natural and on a small scale

Heather Barrett · Posted: Feb 14, 2020 4:14 PM ET | Last Updated: February 14 
 
Mike Little, the fourth-generation owner-operator of Briggs & Little, with his sons John and C.J., who work on the factory floor.
From left to right: Mike Little, the fourth-generation owner-operator of Briggs & Little, with his sons John and C.J., who work on the factory floor. (Heather Barrett/CBC)
 
Briggs & Little's knitting yarn is a bit scratchy and has a faint whiff of its barnyard origins. 
 
But in today's $2.8-billion North American knitting market, both the yarn and the small Canadian company that makes it have proved to be surprisingly durable. 
 
"Part of the appeal to our customers is that we're just real people like anyone else," said John Little, the recently retired, third-generation owner and operator of the family-run company.
 
Located in York Mills, N.B., the mill started in 1857 and changed ownership and names over the years. In 1916, the business became Briggs & Little Woolen Mills Ltd., making it Canada's oldest continuously-operating woollen mill and one of the few remaining woollen mills left in North America.
 
The first thing you notice when you enter Briggs & Little's woollen mill is the smell of wet sheep. 
 
"After a while you'll grow to really like it," laughed Mike Little, the mill's current owner-operator, and John's son. Mike is the fourth-generation Little to run the mill. 
 

John Little, the third-generation owner-operator of Briggs & Little Woolen Mills Ltd., in front of the mill's world headquarters in York Mills, near Harvey Station, N.B. Pictured at right: Briggs & Little yarn ready to be shipped to customers.

John Little, the third-generation owner-operator of Briggs & Little Woolen Mills Ltd., in front of the mill's world headquarters in York Mills, near Harvey Station, N.B. Pictured at right: Briggs & Little yarn ready to be shipped to customers. (Heather Barrett/CBC)
 
The mill takes freshly-shorn sheep's wool, most of it from Canadian Co-operative Wool Growers in Carleton Place, Ont., and the rest from individual farmers, and turns it into yarn in a rainbow of colours.  
 

Link to full Briggs & Little story on CBC

Link to download of full story as PDF

 

Posted in Wool News

4H members info night

Written by CCWG Thursday, August 3, 2017

CCWG Wingham Wool Depot hosted an information evening for the local 4H members.

Over 45 4H members and their parents spent the evening learning different aspects of the wool industry in Canada from care of the animals to producing the best fleece possible, shearing techniques, wool skirting to wool grading.

It was an informative night for the next generation of sheep farmers. 

Posted in Wool News